90 Linux Commands frequently used by Linux Sysadmins (updated to 100+)

If you are interested in Linux commands frequently used by Linux sysadmins and power users, I’ve published this five-part series with over 90 update: 100+ Linux commands with links to each of the five articles in this series – click on each subheading. This list covers popular Linux commands used by sysadmins and power users. […]

Choosing the Best Linux Server Distro 2024

Choosing a Linux server distribution for your projects can be a daunting task, especially with the many options available. This guide aims to simplify your decision-making process by highlighting the key features and advantages of the leading Linux server distributions. Each of these distros brings its unique strengths to the table, catering to various needs […]

Linux Performance: Almost Always Add Swap Space – Part 2: ZRAM

In the previous article, we looked at how swap space, particularly swapping, can severely slow down Linux performance. We then tweaked Linux kernel parameters to better use server memory and avoid heavy swapping. That article created some debate and good arguments for and against swap space. For example, if you have more than enough memory […]

Linux Commands frequently used by Linux Sysadmins – Part 5

This is the final part of the five-part series entitled: Linux Commands frequently used by Linux Sysadmins. So far, we’ve covered over 50  commands regularly used by Linux sysadmins and power users. Refer to part 1, part 2, part 3, and part 4. This article will look into another set of commands and command-line tools […]

Could not increase number of max_open_files to more than… (Solution)

A quick solution to the warning “Could not increase number of max_open_files to more than” when starting MySQL or MariaDB. For some background, read How MySQL Opens and Closes Tables. Here’s an excerpt: “The table_open_cache and max_connections system variables affect the maximum number of files the server keeps open. If you increase one or both of […]

Linux Commands frequently used by Linux Sysadmins – Part 4

We are now up to part 4 of this five-part series entitled: Linux Commands frequently used by Linux Sysadmins. By the end of this series, we will cover at least 50 commands. Thus far, we have touched on around 60 commands often used by Linux Sysadmins and power users. Refer also to part 1, part […]

atop for Linux server performance analysis (Guide)

When optimizing Linux server performance, ‘atop’ is a command every system administrator should have in their toolkit. While many sysadmins are well-acquainted with top and htop, atop stands out as a powerhouse tool for real-time system monitoring and in-depth server analysis. In this article, we will explore the ‘atop’ Linux command, examine its advantages, and […]

Linux Commands frequently used by Linux Sysadmins – Part 3

Last week and the week before, I published part 1 and part 2 of this five-part series entitled: Linux Commands frequently used by Linux Sysadmins. Those two articles took us a bit deeper into what I believe are around 50 to 100 commands often used by Linux Sysadmins and power users. Also, see Part 4 and Part 5. […]

Enable Automatic Updates – Fedora/Red Hat + Bonus Tip

Linux server security is crucial to Linux server administration. Part of keeping Linux servers secure is installing security updates shortly after they become available. Too often, compromised servers are a result of pending security updates awaiting manual installation. In general, for critical servers where you cannot afford unplanned downtime should be very careful with automatic updates. While there are […]

Using CentOS CR (Continuous Release) Repo

CentOS (Community Enterprise Operating System) is a Linux distribution that attempts to provide free, enterprise-class, community-supported computing platform functionally compatible with its upstream source, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). CentOS is run by volunteers who work directly with Red Hat’s RPM source files and pushing them to CentOS for release. At times the project will fall behind […]

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